COVID-19 Support

We at Marsden Law hope you are staying safe and well during this unprecedented event. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the people affected by the pandemic, and we appreciate the healthcare workers and local community members who are on the front lines working to contain this virus.

As tireless advocates for our clients and their families, we are always thinking about these issues from a planning perspective. While many people are busy stocking up on food and supplies, what should you be doing from a legal perspective?If the unthinkable happens, do you even have a plan in place?

  • Review your estate plan: Is your Power of Attorney and Health Care Proxy current, and do you know where they are located? Do you have an Advance Directive? Does your family know where to find these important planning documents?
  • Is your Trust funded in order to avoid probate, and to allow someone to easily manage your affairs in the event of your incapacity?
  • Beneficiary Designations - check the designations of your 401K/IRA/Annuities and Life Insurance policies to make sure you have the correct and updated beneficiaries in the event of some unlikely but unforeseen circumstance?

If you have been putting off getting your plan in place, and think NOW is the time to ACT, Attorney Jay Marsden is still working and is also available for virtual or phone consultations. Our staff can begin drafting your planning documents as soon as you fill out our intake questionnaire. We are here to help! Please feel free to reach out to us with any questions you may have.

To get started, contact us today at (508) 858-5324, via email jay@jmarsdenlaw.com, or visit us on the web at www.jmarsdenlaw.com


For those of you who have loved ones in a facility where you are unable to visit and consult with them, the challenges can seem overwhelming. One of the things we have found with our clients, is that many of them (or their children) have questions around how to handle certain situations, and they need some guidance and clarity.

If you are a Health Care Proxy or Power of Attorney for a loved one who is in a facility, and you have questions about your role and responsibilities, please do not hesitate to call us at Marsden Law. We are here to help.


Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced Tuesday that individuals would be allowed to defer up to $1 million in tax payments for up to 90 days. He also said the administration was considering sending checks to Americans.

“We encourage those Americans who can file their taxes to continue to file their taxes on April 15, because for many Americans, you will get tax refunds,” he said Tuesday in a news conference.

If you owe a payment to the IRS, you can defer up to $1 million as an individual, Mnuchin said. “The reason we’re doing $1 million is that covers lots of pass-throughs and small businesses and $10 million to corporations — interest free and penalty free for 90 days,” he said.

“All you have to do is file your taxes; you’ll automatically not get charged interest and penalties.”


Massachusetts State Senator Karen Spilka is updating this site regularly with Metrowest Boston resources and links:

The Senate passed a $2 Trillion Stimulus Package


Massachusetts has approved “An Act providing for virtual notarization to address challenges related to COVID-19. The law is included in its entirety on the Covid-19 section of our website, but the message for our clients is this: for those who are concerned for their safety, and for the safety of their loved ones, we can now notarize documents virtually so clients can achieve their estate planning goals and objective while remaining safe in a location of their own choosing.

SECTION 1. For the purposes of this act, the following words shall have the following meanings unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

“Principal”, a person who is signing a document under this act as a principal or as a credible witness, as defined in section 1 of chapter 222 of the General Laws.

“Satisfactory evidence of identity”, shall have the same meaning as under clause (i) or clause (iii) of the definition of “satisfactory evidence of identity” in section 1 of chapter 222 of the General Laws.

SECTION 2. A notary public appointed under chapter 222 of the General Laws

may perform an acknowledgement, affirmation or other notarial act under said chapter 222 utilizing electronic video conferencing in real time as provided in this act. A principal in any such notarial act may act individually or in a representative capacity.

SECTION 3. (a) An acknowledgment, affirmation or other notarial act utilizing

electronic video conferencing in accordance with this act shall be valid and effective if: (i) the notary public observes each principal’s execution of a document; (ii) both the notary public and each principal are physically located within the commonwealth; (iii) each principal provides the notary public with satisfactory evidence of identity; provided, however, that if the principal is not a United States citizen, a valid passport or other government-issued identification credential that evidences the principal’s nationality or residence and that bears the photographic image of the principal’s face and signature shall constitute satisfactory evidence of identity; provided further, that if the satisfactory evidence of identity is a government-issued identification credential, the principal shall both visually display the principal’s identification credential to the notary public during the video conference and also transmit to the notary public a copy of the front and back of the identification credential, either with the executed document or separately through electronic means; provided further, that if the principal’s identification credential is a United States or foreign passport book, a copy of the front cover and page displaying the principal’s photograph, name and signature shall be a sufficient copy; and provided further, that a copy of any such identification credential shall be retained for a period of 10 years by the notary public, who shall keep it secure and confidential in accordance with state and federal law; (iv) each principal makes the acknowledgment, affirmation or other act to the notary public, as appropriate; (v) a principal causes the executed document to be delivered to the notary public by delivery service, courier or other means in accordance with the notary public’s instructions; and (vi) if the document requiring notarization and executed in the course of closing a transaction involves a mortgage or other conveyance of title to real estate, upon receipt of the executed document, the notary public and each principal engage in a second video conference during which each principal verifies to the notary public that the document received by the notary public is the same document executed during the first video conference.

During any video conference executed under this act, each principal shall also: (i) swear or affirm under the penalties of perjury that the principal is physically located within the commonwealth; and (ii) make a disclosure of any person present in the room with the principal and make that person viewable to the notary public.

(b) Upon completion of the process under subsection (a), the notary public may affix the notary public’s stamp and signature to the executed document, whereupon the notarial act shall be completed.

(c) The notarial certificate attached to the executed document shall include a recital

indicating that the document was notarized remotely under this act. The certificate shall recite the county in which the notary public was located at the time that the notarial act was completed and shall recite the date that the notarial act was completed; provided, however, that the failure to include any of the recitals in this subsection shall not affect the validity or recordability of the document; and provided further, that with respect to a document being notarized in connection with a mortgage financing transaction, the notarial certificate may recite the date stated within the body of the document, even if that date precedes the date of completion of the notarial act.

(d) The notary public shall execute an affidavit confirming under the penalties of perjury

that the notary public has: (i) received a copy of each principal’s current identification credential

and visually inspected the credential during the initial video conference with the principal, if

applicable; (ii) obtained each principal’s verbal assent to any recording of the video conferences;

(iii) taken each principal’s affirmations as to physical presence of the principal within the

commonwealth; and (iv) been informed and noted on the affidavit any person present in the

room, including a statement of the relationship of any person in the room to the principal. The

affidavit shall be retained for a period of 10 years by the notary public.

(e) With respect to any will, nomination of guardian or conservator, caregiver authorization affidavit, trust, durable power of attorney, health care proxy or authorization under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, the document shall be complete when all original counterparts and the notary public’s affidavit are compiled.

SECTION 4. A document executed, acknowledged or notarized under this act, shall be a properly executed, acknowledged and notarized document for all legal purposes in the commonwealth, including, but not limited to, for recording with the registry of deeds of any

county, for filing as a valid will and for filing or recording with any other state, local or federal

agency, court, department or office. With respect to any such document recorded in a registry of

deeds or filed with a registry district of the land court: (i) the affidavit required pursuant to

subsection (d) of section 3 shall not be required to be recorded or filed; and (ii) a principal’s being subsequently determined to have been physically located outside of the commonwealth during any video conference or a principal’s having failed to accurately disclose the presence or identity of others in the room during any video conference, in either case, shall not constitute grounds to set aside the title to real property acquired by an arm’s length third-party mortgagee or purchaser for value.

The expiration, repeal or amendment of this act shall not affect the validity of a notarial

act completed while this act is in effect and performed in accordance with the terms of the act.

SECTION 5. The signature of any witness who participates in the electronic video

conference and whose signature is notarized under this act shall be valid as if the witness had been present to sign in person. A document signed on multiple pages or in multiple locations within the commonwealth or in multiple counterparts shall be valid and effective if it is otherwise in conformity with this act.

SECTION 6. (a) Nothing in this act shall affect any law or regulation governing, authorizing or prohibiting the practice of law, including, but not limited to, the requirement that the closing of a transaction involving a mortgage or other conveyance of title to real estate may only be conducted by an attorney duly admitted to practice law in the commonwealth.

(b) Notwithstanding any provision of this act to the contrary, with respect to any document requiring notarization and executed in the course of closing a transaction involving a mortgage or other conveyance of title to real estate or with respect to any will, nomination of guardian or conservator, caregiver authorization affidavit, trust, durable power of attorney, health care proxy or authorization under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996: (i) only a notary public appointed pursuant to chapter 222 of the General Laws

who is an attorney licensed to practice law in the commonwealth, or a paralegal under the direct supervision of such an attorney, shall perform an acknowledgement, affirmation or other notarial act utilizing electronic video conferencing in real time as provided in this act; and

(ii) if the notary public is a paralegal, any copy of a principal’s identification credential required to be retained pursuant to subsection (a) of section 3 and the affidavit required pursuant to subsection (d) of said section 3 shall be retained by the notary public’s supervising attorney.

(c) Notwithstanding any provision of this act to the contrary, with respect to a document executed in the course of closing a transaction involving a mortgage or other conveyance of title to real estate, if a principal proves their identity by government-issued identification credential in accordance with subsection (a) of section 3 and the principal is not otherwise personally known to the notary public, the principal shall display a secondary form of identification containing the principal’s name to the notary public during the initial video conference. The secondary form of identification shall contain the principal’s photograph or signature or be issued by a government entity. Acceptable secondary forms of identification shall include, but not be limited to, a credit or debit card, a social security card, a municipal tax bill or utility bill; provided, however, that any such municipal tax or utility bill is dated within 60 days of the first video conference.

SECTION 7. Sections 1 to 6, inclusive, are hereby repealed.

SECTION 8. Section 7 shall take effect 3 business days after termination of the governor’s March 10, 2020 declaration of a state of emergency.

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Start Planning Your Future Today!

No matter the size of your estate, it is important to take the time to assess your situation and draft a comprehensive estate plan that includes a last will and testament, strategies to minimize taxes, a durable power of attorney, and guardianship for any minor children. Marsden Law P.C. will develop a custom estate plan that covers your unique needs and ensures you and your loved ones are prepared for major life events and emergencies.

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